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Delicacy - DVD Review

Delicacy

Review by Louise Carleton

IndieLondon Rating: 2.5 out of 5

BROTHERS David and Stephane Foenkinos offer up a sweet French romantic comedy in their latest film Delicacy but while it will appeal to those with a sweet tooth, after a while it becomes a bit too sickly.

It’s been 11 years since Audrey Tatou graced the big screen as Amelie Poulain but in Delicacy it would seem little has changed. Tatou plays the part of Nathalie, a whimsical, cute French wife blissfully married to an equally dashing husband (Pio Marmaï).

Alas, tragedy strikes when said dashing husband heads off for a jog on the traffic clogged streets of Paris. What happens next is a grisly accident (the Doctor tells us ‘He was rammed by a car’) followed by a period of mourning where we see Nathalie fling herself into her career as a business executive in a vain attempt to bury her grief under a groaning workload.

Three years pass and potential suitors appear in the form of two of Nathalie’s work colleagues. The first one is her married, flash and charmless boss Charles (Bruno Todeschini), the second a plain, fat, balding Swedish Subordinate called Markus (François Damiens). The only thing both men have in common is their infatuation with Nathalie and her barely there waist and light as a soufflé manners.

Typical of the ‘rom-com’, a beauty and the beast moment follows as we watch on as the sleazy boss’s attempts to seduce her fail thus pushing her into the arms of the Swedish buffoon.

Their love affair is one that seems to be lacking in any type of passion and although they are quirky, cute and sweet to watch, the film fails to really pack a punch.

The narrative lags more than once and Tatou and Damiens and their awkward relationship border on the irritating.

That said it’s worth sticking with until the end for some genuinely moving scenes which are nicely mixed with some great moments of humour and some fantastic one liners.

Fans of Tatou will adore it for her glucose laden performances but while the film is charming and more than entertaining in places, it’s sadly no feast or delicacy but rather a pleasing snack that only just does the job.

In French, with subtitles

Certificate: 12A
Running time: 108mins
UK Blu-ray & DVD Release: August 6, 2012