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Paranoia - DVD Review

Paranoia

Review by Rob Carnevale

IndieLondon Rating: 2 out of 5

QUITE what attracted such a high calibre cast to a film like Paranoia is the only really worthwhile question to ponder after seeing this extremely disappointing thriller.

Gary Oldman and Harrison Ford play business rivals, Richard Dreyfuss crops up as a working class father, Liam Hemsworth makes his bid for leading man status and the likes of Amber Heard, Josh Holloway, Julian McMahon and Embeth Davidtz round out the starry ensemble.

But there’s something missing in the techno thriller that results. The pacing is pedestrian, the plotting is absurd and no one really looks that interested.

Director Robert Luketic seems ill-suited to the task despite having delivered one pretty decent thriller in the gambling film 21. But a look down his resume also reveals duds like Monster In Law, The Ugly Truth and Killers and therein lies another of the film’s many problems. Paranoia is most definitely in keeping with that kind of forgettable work.

The plot follows a young man named Adam Cassidy (Hemsworth) as he secures an entry level job at Wyatt Corporation, the company owned by the ruthless Nicholas Wyatt (Oldman). Yet after making a costly mistake, Wyatt first sacks him and then threatens to prosecute him unless he goes to work for his bitter rival (and former mentor) Jock Goddard (Ford) as a spy, forcing Cassidy to find a way out from under Wyatt’s increasingly desperate and eventually murderous spell.

Luketic’s film does, admittedly, have potential, especially given its high-calibre cast and setting within the high powered business world. But nothing about it works.

Hemsworth emerges as a bland leading presence, there’s a lack of fireworks between the major players and with little or no tension during the sparse set pieces, the film never grips your attention in the way that it should.

The overall result is a film that rolls from being laughably bad one minute to onerously dull the next. It’s one to forget for everyone involved.

Certificate: 12A
Running time: 1hr 40mins
UK Blu-ray & DVD Release: March 10, 2014