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Casting announced for Globe's The Comedy of Errors and Doctor Scroggy’s War

Casting news

FULL casting has been announced for Shakespeare’s Globe’s productions of Blanche McIntyre’s The Comedy of Errors and the world premiere of Howard Brenton’s Doctor Scroggy’s War.

Shakespeare’s The Comedy of Errors runs from September 4 (previews from August 30) to October 12, 2014.

Take one pair of estranged twin brothers (both called Antipholus), and one pair of estranged twin servants (both called Dromio), keep them in ignorance of each other and throw them into a city with a reputation for sorcery, and you have all the ingredients for theatrical chaos.

One Antipholus is astonished by his foreign hospitality; the other enraged by the hostility of his home town. The Dromios, caught between the two, are soundly beaten for obeying all the wrong orders.

The Comedy of Errors stars Matthew Needham (as Antipholus of Ephesus), Simon Harrison (Antipholus of Syracuse), Brodie Ross (Dromio of Syracuse) and Jamie Wilkes (Dromio of Ephesus). Eminent stage and screen actor James Laurenson (The Bourne Identity, State of Play) will appear as Egeon.

They are joined by Stefan Adegbola, Andy Apollo, Paul Brendan, Linda Broughton, Gershwyn Eustache Jr, Becci Gemmell, Peter Hamilton Dyer, Emma Jerrold, Hattie Ladbury and Anne Odeke.

Winner of the 2011 Critics’ Circle ‘Most Promising Newcomer’ Award and named Best Director at the 2013 TMA UK Theatre Awards, Blanche McIntyre’s career has gone from strength to strength. She most recently directed Dawn King’s spy drama Ciphers at the Bush Theatre, and her other credits include The Birthday Party (Royal Exchange, Manchester), the critically-acclaimed The Seagull (Headlong), and Accolade and Foxfinder (Finborough Theatre).

An Associate Director at the Nuffield Theatre, she has also written the script for the film adaptation of Hippopotamus based on the novel by Stephen Fry.

The Comedy of Errors is designed by James Cotterill and composed by Olly Fox.

Howard Brenton’s Doctor Scroggy’s War runs from September 17 (previews from September 12) to October 10, 2014.

Doctor Scroggy’s War sees playwright Howard Brenton and director John Dove, the team behind Anne Boleyn (Best New Play – What’sOnStage Awards) and In Extremis, return to the Globe to offer a sideways look at the First World War in its centenary year. By turns funny and moving, the play explores the work of Sir Harold Gillies – the founding father of plastic surgery – and his profound impact on the lives of traumatized young soldiers.

Doctor Scroggy’s War stars Will Featherstone (Hippolyta in A Midsummer Night’s Dream for Propeller Theatre Company) as Jack Twigg and James Garnon (The Duchess of Malfi, The Tempest, Gabriel and Twelfth Night with Stephen Fry and Mark Rylance, all at Shakespeare’s Globe) as Harold Gillies/Doctor Scroggy.

Completing the cast are Catherine Bailey, Sam Cox, Patrick Driver, Daisy Hughes, Joe Jameson, Tom Kanji, Christopher Logan, William Mannering, Holly Morgan, Rhiannon Oliver, Keith Ramsay, Paul Rider, Katy Stephens and Dickon Tyrrell.

Howard Brenton first came to fame with his controversial political plays of the 1970s and 80s, including The Romans in Britain and Pravda. He is the winner of two Evening Standard Awards for Best Play. His recent work includes The Arrest of Ai Weiwei (Hampstead Theatre) and the critically-acclaimed Anne Boleyn and In Extremis (Shakespeare’s Globe). He has also written extensively for the BBC TV series Spooks.

Doctor Scroggy’s War is designed by Michael Taylor and composed by William Lyons.

Tickets: £5 – £42 – available from the box office on +44 (0) 20 7401 9919, online at www.shakespearesglobe.com/, or in person at Shakespeare’s Globe – Monday to Saturday, 10am – 6pm (8pm on performance days); Sundays, 10am – 5pm (7pm on performance days).

Also at Shakespeare’s Globe: Jonathan Munby’s Antony and Cleopatra, starring Eve Best (until August 24) and David Eldridge’s brand new play Holy Warriors (until August 24). Both are part of 2014’s Arms and the Man season.