Ali G In Da House (15)

Review by Tim Minor

DVD SPECIAL FEATURES: Audio commentary with Ali G and best mate Ricky C; Deleted scenes (21 mins); Video diary (11 mins); Takin' Da Talk Wiv Ali G; Ali's gallery; Trailers; Regions 2/4.

IT'S got guns, it’s got bitches, it’s got hoes. It’s got fast cars and it’s got enough double entendres to fill anyone’s box. Ali G hits the big screen this week in Ali G Indahouse, 90 minutes of often amusing, sometimes embarrassing, crude and rude comedy.

The incredible plot is not worth picking over in much detail, suffice to say it involves a failed attempt to overthrow the British Prime Minister (Michael Gambon), bestiality and all the political corruption that we come to expect in our leaders. In no time at all, Ali G emerges as the new voice of youth and ‘realness’ whose political inexperience inadvertently sends the PM straight to the top of the Opinion Polls – much to the chagrin of the evil Deputy Prime Minister ably played by Charles Dance.

As the Halls of Power reverberate to the ‘booyakashas’ and ‘aiiis’ from the Wu-Tang clad leader of the West Staines Massive, things inevitably start to go wrong and we see our hapless hero forced to resign after treating the World Summit attendees to a brew of HMS Customs finest confiscations. But enough about the plot line already.

While the energy and humour are engaging for the first twenty minutes, they start to wear you down towards the end of the film and the endless knob gags and obsession with ‘Batty Boys’ soon grow tiresome. Whilst one appreciates that Ali G is never going to be politically correct (heaven forbid!), I wasn’t quite prepared for jokes about Mongols, but fortunately that was the only line that came anywhere near to offending.

There are other redeeming features of the film however. The soundtrack features some real talent including NWA, Public Enemy, General Levy, Missy Elliot, So Solid Crew, and Oxide and Neutrino. And fortunately for the boys in the audience there’s sufficient flesh to distract from the dwindling humour. First among the belles is the fabulous Rhona Mitra. Playing personal assistant to Charles Dance’s evil Chancellor, she has a great wardrobe and my does she show it off beautifully.

The film ends happily-ever-after once all the Staines Massives (including Langley Village, Iver Heath and Englefield Green) bury the hatchet and join forces to defeat the crooked Chancellor and peace is finally restored to Staines (unfortunately for Slough, as you’ll see when you watch it).

If you first came across Ali G on the 11 O’Clock show and have since tired of his performance, perhaps you should avoid this one. But if you’ve been keeping up to date with his latest offerings then no doubt this will tickle your fancy too.