Film

Theatre

Music

Clubs

Comedy

Events

Kids

Food

 

A/V Room

Books

DVD

Games

 

Competitions

Gallery

Contact

Join

Brown Sugar (12A)



Review by: Katherine Kaminsky | Rating: One

DVD FEATURES: None listed

BROWN Sugar begins with a collection of interviews with rap artists, talking about their favourite songs, and who has inspired them.

Yet this merely lulls you into a false sense of security, as you imagine you are about to be taken on a trip down memory lane. Sadly, you're not and the interesting bit stops here.

Dre (Taye Diggs) and Sidney (Sanaa Lathan) are lifelong friends who share a love for hip-hop.

Fifteen years on, she is a music critic and he is a music executive.

The night before Dre's wedding, they kiss for the first time, and both are made aware that perhaps their relationship is more than just friends.

Dre goes ahead and marries Reese (Nicole Ari Parker), a lawyer, and Sidney gets involved with a famous basketball player, Kelby (Boris Kodjoe).

But Dre feels the music company he works for has sold out, especially when they sign two caricature rappers, named Ren and Ten.

His fears are confirmed when he tries to sign a talent he sees rapping in a club, but Chris (Mos Def) refuses Dre's offer, due to his deep convictions about staying true to the music he loves.

This provokes Dre to return to a purer way of making music and he sets up his own label.

Reese, understandably upset that Dre has discussed this decision with old friend, Sidney, before telling her, finds herself battling against their close friendship and literally fighting for her marriage in an amusing boxing sequence at the gym.

Meanwhile, Sidney is finding it hard to commit to Kelby, as he shows little interest in her writing career.

Dre then signs Chris, who we discover is driving a yellow cab for a living, and embarks on solely representing and pushing his rapping career.

Brown Sugar is the type of film in which the cast look great, as do the clothes, and the designer apartments, but the only thing lacking is the script.

It drags you through every predictable scene, laboriously.

The best thing happening in Brown Sugar is Mos Def as the rapping cabby, you won't watch anyone else in any scene he is in.

# A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z